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Stammering

​​What is stammering?

Causes of stammering

What should I do when my child stutters?

Some common questions...

Useful links




What is stammering?

Stammering is a communication disorder in which the flow of speech is broken by repetitions (li-li-like this), prolongations (lllllike this), or abnormal stoppages (no sound) of sounds and syllables. There may also be unusual facial and body movements associated with the effort to speak. Avoidance of certain words and/or certain speaking situations (e.g. asking questions). Indeed some children can become very good at hiding stammering by adopting avoidance or by simply becoming very quiet.

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Causes of stammering

There are 4 factors most likely to contribute to the development of stammering:

  1. Genetics - approximately 60% of those who stammer have a family member who does also;
  2. Child development - children with other speech and language problems or developmental delays are more likely to stammer;
  3. Neurophysiology - recent research has shown that people who stutter process speech and language in different areas of the brain than those who do not stammer; and
  4. Family dynamics - high expectations and fast-paced lifestyles can contribute to stammering.

Stammering may occur when a combination of factors comes together and may have different causes in different people. It is probable that what causes stammering differs from what makes it continue or get worse. 

 

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What should I do when my child stutters? 

 

 

Stammering Motivational Quote 

  1. Keep eye contact and give your child enough time to finish speaking;
  2. Try not to fill in words or sentences;
  3. Let your child know by your manner and actions that you are listening to what she says - not how she says it;
  4. Model wait time – taking two seconds before you answer a child’s question;
  5. Insert more pauses into your own speech to help reduce speech pressure;
  6. Avoid interrupting your child or him/her interrupting others – taking turns is important;
  7. Reduce the number of questions you ask and give him/her enough time to answer before asking another question;
  8. Praise your child for the things s/he can do well to boost up his self-esteem; and
  9. Routine and structure in daily life are important as stammering and a fast lifestyle do not always go well together. 


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 some common questions...

 Some common questions...

How many people stammer?

Approximately 1% of the population.

What is the ratio of males to females who stammer?

Stammering affects four times as many males as females.

I read about a new cure for stammering...Is there such a thing?

There are no instant miracle cures for stammering. Therapy, electronic devices, and even drugs are not an overnight process. However, a speech language pathologist can help not only children but also teenagers, young adults and even older adults make significant progress toward fluency.

Is stammering caused by emotional or psychological problems?

Children and adults who stammer are no more likely to have psychological or emotional problems than children and adults who do not. There is no reason to believe that emotional trauma causes stammering.

I think my child is beginning to stammer. Should I wait or seek help?

It is best to seek ways that you, the parents, can help as soon as possible.

If the stammering persists beyond three to six months or is particularly severe, you may want to seek help from a Speech-Language Pathologist. 

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Useful Links image


Useful links

 

 

 

Stuttering Foundation of America

A non profit organisation helping those who stutter


Fluency Specialization 

​European Clinical Specialization in Fluency Disorders

 

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